A demon-beast first referred to in Persian mythology and described as a cross between a two-legged dragon and a serpent, with the head of a cockerel, wielding a whip over his subjects' heads. The name means 'supreme being' and, in Greek notation, the sum of the letters is 365. Thus, Abrasax was believed to be the Lord of the 365 Virtues, one of which is supposed to prevail on each day of the year. His name gave rise to the magical word Abracadabra, which according to Samonicus was:
A powerful weapon against ague, flux, and toothache when written off parchment and suspended around the neck by a linen thread.
From the fifteenth century onwards, it was generally believed that monks had become lazy and corrupt, preferring drunken revelry to sober prayers. Such monks were said to be tempted by Abbey Lubbers, the ghosts of drunken or greedy Friars who haunted monastery cellars. The only way to banish an Abbey Lubbers was for the Prior to confront and demand in full view of the other monks that he leave - in short, to publicly repent. Friar Rush was a well-known Abbey Lubber in England. Banished for his misdeed, the other shocked monks reformed and took to virtuous living when he had gone.

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